Jessica Chastain is Merida from ‘Brave’ in Annie Leibovitz’s latest Disney portrait | /Film

Jessica Chastain is Merida from ‘Brave’ in Annie Leibovitz’s latest Disney portrait | /Film

11:20 AM ET - Available for the next hour.

12:20 PM ET

278,993 plays

portkey:

Listen: Katy Perry’s “Roar” layered over Sara Bareilles’s “Brave,” bpms matched to 92.5]

"Brave" release date: april 23, 2013

"Roar" release date: august 12, 2013

As Vulture points out, Bareilles is being gracious about this — and it’s not like they’re the only songs to sound like this.

First Listen: Sara Bareilles’ new song “Brave”

Peter Hollens Covers “Brave” by Josh Groban Acappella

(by peterhollens)

The set includes ‘Home Alone’ and ‘Home Alone 2’ at 52% off its $25 list price. This isn’t a four-hour lightning deal, but I’m sure it won’t last forever. You filthy animal. 

That said, Amazon’s current four-hour lightning deals are…

Pixar’s latest is on sale for the next four hours at over 75% off the $40 list price. The set includes  the film on Blu-ray, DVD and a bonus disc. 

First Look: Pixar’s ‘Brave’ Spin-off Short “The Legend of Mor’du” | EW

Though the movie came out weeks ago, this very long essay says everything I wish I could have in my review, in a much more eloquent way. The TL;DR of it all is basically that the presence of the mother and the central mother-daughter conflict have never been done before in this genre and it deserves much more recognition than it was given.

Note: Lili Loofbourow, the post’s writer, gave her essay the headline “Just Another Princess Movie.” I created the headline above.

burbanked:

When we left Brave this weekend, my boys and I debated whether or not they’d worked in the Pizza Planet truck, and one of my brilliant kids suggested it was probably in this scene!

The more you know.

disneyqueen:

Pizza Planet Truck and Sully Monsters University Easter eggs in Brave.

(Source: courtneyska)

25,897 plays

thetvscreen:

Birdy with Mumford & Sons | “Learn Me Right”

Birdy could sing the phonebook and I would love it.

More ‘Brave’ soundtrack! Feel free to imagine this as a song from ‘Brave’ the musical, that doesn’t yet exist.

19,769 plays

Julie Fowlis - “Touch the Sky”

'Brave' may not have been a musical proper, but it used soundtrack in certain places that evoked classic Disney. What you're picturing in your head for this song is exactly how it was shown in the movie. Merida could have opened her mouth to sing it (instead of it just playing in the background) and I wouldn't have been surprised.

(via thesecondtotheright)

Review: ‘Brave’
Once upon a time, there lived a princess in a castle… think you know the rest? About one third into Pixar’s latest, you’ll probably think you do, but as with all good storytelling, nothing is what it seems. And what seems like a straight forward story about a princess and her suitors turns out to be something else entirely. And we all should thank Mark Andrews, Pixar, Disney, and Disney’s marketing department for keeping it a secret.
Anyone that was concerned about another misstep from the people who brought you ‘Up’, ‘Toy Story’, ‘Wall-E’, ‘Finding Nemo’, ‘Ratatouille’, and ‘The Incredibles’ can rest assured. ‘Brave’ is firmly in the win column, and only improves upon their already high batting average. It belongs far more in the same breath as those than it does with ‘A Bug’s Life’ or ‘Cars’. It has everything you’ve come to expect from them, including but not limited to breathtaking visuals, relatable, enriched characters, strong, effective storytelling and vast, deep emotion. 
Disney has built much of its legacy on telling stories about princesses. Pixar, who finally got around to taking a stab at it, manage not only to pay tribute to the path that’s been paved, but cut their own way. ‘Brave’ echoes ‘Mulan’ and ‘Beauty and the Beast’ but only barely. Their princess, Merida, has higher concerns and feels more modern than many to come before her. On a design level, she immediately becomes iconic; her lush, almost-unbelievable red locks pop off the screen in every scene (and I saw it in 2D). Her motivations and character growth are pure, if a bit hazy on a grander scale. ’Brave’ is a storybook come to life, with much of what you’d expect from such a film. It includes castles, an evil witch, magic, horses, kings and queens - but never does it feel redundant or derivative. 
Like Merida herself, ‘Brave’ isn’t interested in finding love. Well, not the love you’re expecting anyway. Where a lesser film would be about Merida breaking out on her own, not wishing to settle down with a prince, the focus is instead on [SPOILERS HERE IN] the mother-daughter relationship. It’s one that isn’t often explored in these types of stories, but makes logical sense as a conflict. That and it’s entirely relatable as an allegory for modern mother-daughter relationships.
Pixar and Disney did such a fantastic job at keeping this aspect a secret, that it comes as a genuine shock when the Queen turns into a bear (there I said it). It’s the opposite of the complaints lobbed at ‘Prometheus’ and should become a new standard in Hollywood. Showing only the first act in the ads and trailers allows for a much more resonant, genuine and complete film. The full-bleed emotion catches you off guard and registers hard. ‘Brave’ isn’t even overly complicated, it doesn’t have many plot twists after that first major one, but because you’re not able to get there before the movie does it becomes more powerful. [END OF SPOILERS]
There’s a certain lack of subtlety that may turn some viewers off. Early on and then less throughout, there are some painful, slapstick-y moments that seem to be out of another film or belonging to another animation studio. They’re somewhat far and in between and are surely there for younger viewers, but to a more mature palette (with a perhaps skewed version of Pixar in their heads) it can be bothersome. 
In a lot of ways, ‘Brave’ lives up to its title. It bucks many trends of typical fairytale princess stories, while operating within the system. One can only hope its marketing plan sets a precedent in the industry. It’s unlikely but movies would be better off for it. Pixar, keep up the good work.

Review: ‘Brave

Once upon a time, there lived a princess in a castle… think you know the rest? About one third into Pixar’s latest, you’ll probably think you do, but as with all good storytelling, nothing is what it seems. And what seems like a straight forward story about a princess and her suitors turns out to be something else entirely. And we all should thank Mark Andrews, Pixar, Disney, and Disney’s marketing department for keeping it a secret.

Anyone that was concerned about another misstep from the people who brought you ‘Up’, ‘Toy Story’, ‘Wall-E’, ‘Finding Nemo’, ‘Ratatouille’, and ‘The Incredibles’ can rest assured. ‘Brave’ is firmly in the win column, and only improves upon their already high batting average. It belongs far more in the same breath as those than it does with ‘A Bug’s Life’ or ‘Cars’. It has everything you’ve come to expect from them, including but not limited to breathtaking visuals, relatable, enriched characters, strong, effective storytelling and vast, deep emotion. 

Disney has built much of its legacy on telling stories about princesses. Pixar, who finally got around to taking a stab at it, manage not only to pay tribute to the path that’s been paved, but cut their own way. ‘Brave’ echoes ‘Mulan’ and ‘Beauty and the Beast’ but only barely. Their princess, Merida, has higher concerns and feels more modern than many to come before her. On a design level, she immediately becomes iconic; her lush, almost-unbelievable red locks pop off the screen in every scene (and I saw it in 2D). Her motivations and character growth are pure, if a bit hazy on a grander scale. ’Brave’ is a storybook come to life, with much of what you’d expect from such a film. It includes castles, an evil witch, magic, horses, kings and queens - but never does it feel redundant or derivative. 

Like Merida herself, ‘Brave’ isn’t interested in finding love. Well, not the love you’re expecting anyway. Where a lesser film would be about Merida breaking out on her own, not wishing to settle down with a prince, the focus is instead on [SPOILERS HERE IN] the mother-daughter relationship. It’s one that isn’t often explored in these types of stories, but makes logical sense as a conflict. That and it’s entirely relatable as an allegory for modern mother-daughter relationships.

Pixar and Disney did such a fantastic job at keeping this aspect a secret, that it comes as a genuine shock when the Queen turns into a bear (there I said it). It’s the opposite of the complaints lobbed at ‘Prometheus’ and should become a new standard in Hollywood. Showing only the first act in the ads and trailers allows for a much more resonant, genuine and complete film. The full-bleed emotion catches you off guard and registers hard. ‘Brave’ isn’t even overly complicated, it doesn’t have many plot twists after that first major one, but because you’re not able to get there before the movie does it becomes more powerful. [END OF SPOILERS]

There’s a certain lack of subtlety that may turn some viewers off. Early on and then less throughout, there are some painful, slapstick-y moments that seem to be out of another film or belonging to another animation studio. They’re somewhat far and in between and are surely there for younger viewers, but to a more mature palette (with a perhaps skewed version of Pixar in their heads) it can be bothersome. 

In a lot of ways, ‘Brave’ lives up to its title. It bucks many trends of typical fairytale princess stories, while operating within the system. One can only hope its marketing plan sets a precedent in the industry. It’s unlikely but movies would be better off for it. Pixar, keep up the good work.

theweekmagazine:

Fiery-haired Scottish princess Merida, the star of Pixar’s Brave, boasts a mane comprising 1,500 individually animated curls. Pixar is very detail-oriented. Here, a numerical look at how that bit of trivia stacks up to the minutiae of other Pixar films:
270 — Types of food created for Ratatouille, the film about a rat-turned-gourmet-chef
1,150,000 — Individual hairs rendered on Ratatouille’s rodent hero, Remy
110,000 — Individual hairs that the average real-life person has
20,622 — Balloons used to elevate Carl’s house in Up.
200 — Turtles in Finding Nemo’s turtle dive sequence
2,500 — Different sounds recorded for WALL-E, twice the average of a Star Wars movie 
More numbers

theweekmagazine:

Fiery-haired Scottish princess Merida, the star of Pixar’s Brave, boasts a mane comprising 1,500 individually animated curls. Pixar is very detail-oriented. Here, a numerical look at how that bit of trivia stacks up to the minutiae of other Pixar films:

270 — Types of food created for Ratatouille, the film about a rat-turned-gourmet-chef

1,150,000 — Individual hairs rendered on Ratatouille’s rodent hero, Remy

110,000 — Individual hairs that the average real-life person has

20,622 — Balloons used to elevate Carl’s house in Up.

200 — Turtles in Finding Nemo’s turtle dive sequence

2,500 — Different sounds recorded for WALL-E, twice the average of a Star Wars movie 

More numbers

Character Art From Pixar’s Brave | ComingSoon
Based on all we’ve seen from Brave, I’m starting to guess that there’s a big act-one or act-two twist. They really haven’t shown us a whole lot in the trailers in terms of general plotting, with the main conflict being particularly vague.
I’m thinking that whatever it is they’re hiding is going to blindside us, a la the opening gut punch of Up.

Character Art From Pixar’s Brave | ComingSoon

Based on all we’ve seen from Brave, I’m starting to guess that there’s a big act-one or act-two twist. They really haven’t shown us a whole lot in the trailers in terms of general plotting, with the main conflict being particularly vague.

I’m thinking that whatever it is they’re hiding is going to blindside us, a la the opening gut punch of Up.