New Posters: ‘Interstellar' | The Film Stage

The theaters of the future will be bigger and more beautiful than ever before. They will employ expensive presentation formats that cannot be accessed or reproduced in the home (such as, ironically, film prints). And they will still enjoy exclusivity, as studios relearn the tremendous economic value of the staggered release of their products.

The projects that most obviously lend themselves to such distinctions are spectacles. But if history is any guide, all genres, all budgets will follow. Because the cinema of the future will depend not just on grander presentation, but on the emergence of filmmakers inventive enough to command the focused attention of a crowd for hours.

These new voices will emerge just as we despair that there is nothing left to be discovered. As in the early ’90s, when years of bad multiplexing had soured the public on movies, and a young director named Quentin Tarantino ripped through theaters with a profound sense of cinema’s past and an instinct for reclaiming cinema’s rightful place at the head of popular culture.

Never before has a system so willingly embraced the radical teardown of its own formal standards. But no standards means no rules. Whether photochemical or video-based, a film can now look or sound like anything.

It’s unthinkable that extraordinary new work won’t emerge from such an open structure. That’s the part I can’t wait for.
'Interstellar' Spoiler: Jessica Chastain Is …

Today’s ‘Interstellar’ trailer is very obviously leaving something out — and may only be showing us the first act of the movie. Now, one film reporter has tweeted a seemingly significant reveal that may clue us in to what’s really going on. Though some are saying this may be clear in the trailer, I didn’t find it to be that obvious.

Spoiler after the break

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Full Trailer: ‘Interstellar' - Nov 7

Written by Jonathan and Christopher Nolan, directed by Christopher Nolan, starring Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Michael Caine, Jessica Chastain, Wes Bentley, William Devane, Topher Grace, John Lithgow, Ellen Burstyn and Mackenzie Foy.

I like the idea of Nolan taking on environmentalism and space, and this feels like one of his most conventional films to date. There’s obviously something else going on here that we’re not seeing. It’s clear this is only covering the first act or part of the film.

Christopher Nolan Installed an IMAX Camera on a Learjet for ‘Interstellar’ | /Film

Christopher Nolan Installed an IMAX Camera on a Learjet for ‘Interstellar’ | /Film

Directed and co-written by Christopher Nolan (“Inception,” “The Dark Knight” Trilogy), the production will travel the globe and utilize a mixture of 35mm anamorphic and IMAX film photography to bring to the screen a script based on the combination of an original idea by Nolan and an existing script by Jonathan Nolan, originally developed for Paramount Pictures and producer Lynda Obst. The new script chronicles the adventures of a group of explorers who make use of a newly discovered wormhole to surpass the limitations on human space travel and conquer the vast distances involved in an interstellar voyage.

Duh.

Huge huge grain of salt with this one as it seems like Latino Review doing a lot of guess work. They’ve been right in the past, but there doesn’t seem to be a lot of hard evidence here. 

When Gotham is in ashes you have my permission to save. 43% off the $52 list price on Blu-ray and 49% on DVD, with no time limit set. Because some men just want to watch the world save. 

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Christopher Nolan’s Goodbye Letter to the Batman Franchise

danhacker:

“Alfred. Gordon. Lucius. Bruce … Wayne. Names that have come to mean so much to me. Today, I’m three weeks from saying a final good-bye to these characters and their world. It’s my son’s ninth birthday. He was born as the Tumbler was being glued together in my garage from random parts of model kits. Much time, many changes. A shift from sets where some gunplay or a helicopter were extraordinary events to working days where crowds of extras, building demolitions, or mayhem thousands of feet in the air have become familiar.

“People ask if we’d always planned a trilogy. This is like being asked whether you had planned on growing up, getting married, having kids. The answer is complicated. When David and I first started cracking open Bruce’s story, we flirted with what might come after, then backed away, not wanting to look too deep into the future. I didn’t want to know everything that Bruce couldn’t; I wanted to live it with him. I told David and Jonah to put everything they knew into each film as we made it. The entire cast and crew put all they had into the first film. Nothing held back. Nothing saved for next time. They built an entire city. Then Christian and Michael and Gary and Morgan and Liam and Cillian started living in it. Christian bit off a big chunk of Bruce Wayne’s life and made it utterly compelling. He took us into a pop icon’s mind and never let us notice for an instant the fanciful nature of Bruce’s methods.

“I never thought we’d do a second—how many good sequels are there? Why roll those dice? But once I knew where it would take Bruce, and when I started to see glimpses of the antagonist, it became essential. We re-assembled the team and went back to Gotham. It had changed in three years. Bigger. More real. More modern. And a new force of chaos was coming to the fore. The ultimate scary clown, as brought to terrifying life by Heath. We’d held nothing back, but there were things we hadn’t been able to do the first time out—a Batsuit with a flexible neck, shooting on Imax. And things we’d chickened out on—destroying the Batmobile, burning up the villain’s blood money to show a complete disregard for conventional motivation. We took the supposed security of a sequel as license to throw caution to the wind and headed for the darkest corners of Gotham.

“I never thought we’d do a third—are there any great second sequels? But I kept wondering about the end of Bruce’s journey, and once David and I discovered it, I had to see it for myself. We had come back to what we had barely dared whisper about in those first days in my garage. We had been making a trilogy. I called everyone back together for another tour of Gotham. Four years later, it was still there. It even seemed a little cleaner, a little more polished. Wayne Manor had been rebuilt. Familiar faces were back—a little older, a little wiser … but not all was as it seemed.

“Gotham was rotting away at its foundations. A new evil bubbling up from beneath. Bruce had thought Batman was not needed anymore, but Bruce was wrong, just as I had been wrong. The Batman had to come back. I suppose he always will.

“Michael, Morgan, Gary, Cillian, Liam, Heath, Christian … Bale. Names that have come to mean so much to me. My time in Gotham, looking after one of the greatest and most enduring figures in pop culture, has been the most challenging and rewarding experience a filmmaker could hope for. I will miss the Batman. I like to think that he’ll miss me, but he’s never been particularly sentimental.”

- Christopher Nolan


(via Coming Soon)

About 65% savings on both accounts. Above is the Inception link, click here for The Dark Knight.