entertainmentweekly:

This week in EW: Django Unchained, unchained.
Poster: ‘Django Unchained’
danhacker:

The Theatrical Poster For Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’
After countless character posters, Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’ finally gets it’s final theatrical poster, which is pretty damn sweet.
‘Django Unchained’ stars Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Leonardo DiCaprio, Kerry Washington, Samuel L. Jackson, “and Don Johnson as Big Daddy.” and opens Christmas day.
via:collider

Poster: ‘Django Unchained’

danhacker:

The Theatrical Poster For Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’

After countless character posters, Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’ finally gets it’s final theatrical poster, which is pretty damn sweet.

‘Django Unchained’ stars Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Leonardo DiCaprio, Kerry Washington, Samuel L. Jackson, “and Don Johnson as Big Daddy.” and opens Christmas day.

via:collider

totalfilm:

Having shied away from an on-screen appearance in his last few films, Quentin Tarantino is set to return to the spotlight in Django Unchained, in which he is set to make a cameo…

suicideblonde:

By now, most Quentin Tarantino fans are aware of the connections interlaced throughout all of his films. John Travolta’s Vincent Vega in Pulp Fiction is the brother of Michael Madsen’s Vic Vega in Reservoir Dogs, Harvey Keitel’s Mr. White worked with Alabama from True Romance, the plot basis for Kill Bill is described as the synopsis for a TV series in Pulp Fiction, etc.

Now the epiphany that Eli Roth’s character of Donny Donowitz aka “The Bear Jew” in Inglourious Basterds is the father of the movie producer Lee Donowitz in True Romance has inspired a truly mind-blowing theory that the rest of the films (chronologically speaking) in Tarantino’s filmography take place in a world where [Inglorious Basterds spoiler] World War II came to an end when Adolf Hitler was brutally murdered in a movie theater by the Basterds.

This initial connection was brought up in an article on Cracked, but a poster on Reddit (via David Chen’s Twitter) has more eloquently summed up what this means for Tarantino’s movieverse:

As it turns out, Donny Donowitz, ‘The Bear Jew’, is the father of movie producer Lee Donowitz from True Romance – which means that, in Tarantino’s universe, everybody grew up learning about how a bunch of commando Jews machine gunned Hitler to death in a burning movie theater, as opposed to quietly killing himself in a bunker. Because World War 2 ended in a movie theater, everybody lends greater significance to pop culture, hence why seemingly everybody has Abed-level knowledge of movies and TV. Likewise, because America won World War 2 in one concentrated act of hyperviolent slaughter, Americans as a whole are more desensitized to that sort of thing. Hence why Butch is unfazed by killing two people, Mr. White and Mr. Pink take a pragmatic approach to killing in their line of work, Esmerelda the cab driver is obsessed with death, etc. You can extrapolate this further when you realize that Tarantino’s movies are technically two universes – he’s gone on record as saying that Kill Bill and From Dusk ‘Til Dawn take place in a ‘movie movie universe’; that is, they’re movies that characters from the Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, and Death Proof universe would go to see in theaters. (Kill Bill, after all, is basically Fox Force Five, right on down to Mia Wallace playing the title role.) What immediately springs to mind about Kill Bill and From Dusk ‘Til Dawn? That they’re crazy violent, even by Tarantino standards. These are the movies produced in a world where America’s crowning victory was locking a bunch of people in a movie theater and blowing it to bits – and keep in mind, Lee Donowitz, son of one of the people on the suicide mission to kill Hitler, is a very successful movie producer. Basically, it turns every Tarantino movie into alternate reality sci fi. I love it so hard.

Quentin Tarantino’s Favorite (and worst) Films of 2011

folkinz:

Quentin Tarantino’s official Top 11 of 2011

  1. Midnight In Paris
  2. Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes
  3. Moneyball
  4. The Skin I Live In
  5. X-Men: First Class
  6. Young Adult
  7. Attack The Block
  8. Red State
  9. Warrior
  10. The Artist / Our Idiot Brother (tie)
  11. The Three Musketeers

Others considered in no particular order

  • 50/50
  • Beginners
  • Hugo
  • The Iron Lady
  • Carnage
  • Green Hornet
  • Green Lantern
  • Captain America
  • The Descendants
  • My Week With Marilyn
  • Fast Five
  • The Tree Of Life
  • The Hangover Part II
  • Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol
  • The Beaver
  • Contagion
  • The Sitter
  • War Horse

Nice Try Award

  • Drive
  • Hanna
  • Drive Angry
  • Real Steel

Best Director

  • Pedro Almodovar
  • Bennett Miller
  • Woody Allen
  • Jason Reitman
  • Michel Hazanavicius

Best Original Screenplay

  • Midnight In Paris
  • Young Adult
  • Red State
  • Attack The Block
  • Our Idiot Brother
  • Beginners

Best Adapted Screenplay

  • Moneyball
  • The Skin I live In
  • Carnage
  • Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes
  • Hugo
  • X-Men: First Class

Worst Films

  • Sucker Punch
  • Potiche (Trophy Wife)
  • Miral
  • Insidious
  • Rampart
  • Straw Dogs
  • Paranormal Activity 3
  • Meek’s Cutoff

Try not to lose your mind, everyone.

geminitactic:

I couldn’t see him in this anyway.